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"I look upon Upton Sinclair as one of the greatest novelists in the world, the Zola of America." -Arthur Conan Doyle

One of America's most influential novels of social reform:
Upton Sinclair's The Jungle
first edition, inscribed by the author

Upton Sinclair: The Jungle, first edition inscribed by Sinclair "There was never the least attention paid to what was cut up for sausage; there would come all the way back from Europe old sausage that had been rejected, and that was moldy and white - it would be dosed with borax and glycerine, and dumped into the hoppers, and made over again for home consumption. 

There would be meat that had tumbled out on the floor, in the dirt and sawdust, where the workers had tramped and spit uncounted billions of consumption germs. There would be meat stored in great piles in rooms; and the water from leaky roofs would drip over it, and thousands of rats would race about on it. 

It was too dark in these storage places to see well, but a man could run his hand over these piles of meat and sweep off handfuls of the dried dung of rats. These rats were nuisances, and the packers would put poisoned bread out for them; they would die, and then rats, bread, and meat would go into the hoppers together. This is no fairy story and no joke; the meat would be shoveled into carts, and the man who did the shoveling would not trouble to lift out a rat even when he saw one - there were things that went into the sausage in comparison with which a poisoned rat was a tidbit."

SINCLAIR, Upton. The Jungle. New York: The Jungle Publishing Co., 1906. Octavo, original green cloth, stamped in white and black. With Sustainers’ Edition label on front pastedown. $2500.

First edition, first issue, inscribed by Sinclair: "To Joseph Edwards with fraternal greetings of The Author". Edwards was the Liverpool editor of the Labour Annual. 

"Though intended to create sympathy for the exploited and poorly treated immigrant workers in the meat-packing industry, The Jungle instead aroused widespread public indignation at the quality of and impurities in processed meats and thus helped bring about the passage of federal food-inspection laws. Sinclair ironically commented at the time, 'I aimed at the public's heart and by accident I hit it in the stomach.' The Jungle is the most enduring of the works of the 'muckrakers'. Published at Sinclair's own expense after several publishers rejected it, it became a best-seller, and Sinclair used the proceeds to open Helicon Hall, a cooperative-living venture in Englewood, N.J." (Britannica). A near fine copy with cloth clean and bright; extremely slight toning to spine, spine ends showing very minor wear.

 

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